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SCC Caracal Project dedicated to late Nina

Like with every ending of an old and beginning of a new year one starts thinking about how the old year has been and what plans could be made for the year(s) to come. Lots of highlights in the year 2012, like the start of SPOTTED CATS CONSERVATION, a new project and partnership with Daniell Cheetah in SA and with this the realisation of many huge and great projects, like the leopardproject phase I (and relocation of ambassador leopards Feline and Felix), projects for black footed cats and servals, and the brandnew caracalproject dedicated to late caracal Nina. Also we were happy to be able to rescue lions Chuck and Norris out of the hands of the ugly Canned Hunting Business and to have found a sponsor to keep them at the project and to built a huge camp for them.

Like with every ending of an old and beginning of a new year one starts thinking about how the old year has been and what plans could be made for the year(s) to come. Lots of highlights in the year 2012, like the start of SPOTTED CATS CONSERVATION, a new project and partnership with Daniell Cheetah in SA and with this the realisation of many huge and great projects, like the leopardproject phase I (and relocation of ambassador leopards Feline and Felix), projects for black footed cats and servals, and the brandnew caracalproject dedicated to late caracal Nina. Also we were happy to be able to rescue lions Chuck and Norris out of the hands of the ugly Canned Hunting Business and to have found a sponsor to keep them at the project and to built a huge camp for them.

Then the release of the caracalbook, photography by me and Anton Buijen van Weelden (WCW), and lots of PR in magazines, papers, on radio and tv for the projects both in Holland and in SA. We are so grateful for all these things we achieved the past year, but unlike all happiness also great sadness and frustration marked this year, when we thought we were doing the right thing to start a cooperation with Stichting Leeuw at Landgoed Hoenderdaell/Netherlands. This cooperation ended because at this sanctuary they intentionally killed our young caracal Nina. Her arrival and friendship was one of the highlights of this year, but we went through wars having to lose her again because of this act of violence by horrible people. This was 2012.
Looking at 2013 we already have lots of new projects in mind. Leopard Project phase II will start early this year. The caracalproject will be officially opened in January, spreading Nina’s ashes at the spot, also we like to share the iniative for a future project for tigers, in which you really must all participate. A big scale fundraising will start but very transparent so that you all really feel you are taking part of this. Big plans to start a series of WCW/WCM books next year, combined with (all selftaken) pictures, stories and facts from both the catsspecies in their natural habitat but also our ambassador cats. Something to really look forward to. Will keep you all informed. Thanks to you all for the wonderful support and faith in us to do the best we can for the wild cats in the wild as well as in captivity!

-Babette de Jonge- Wild Cats World/Wild Cats Magazine

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Cat of the month

Borneo Bay Cat (Pardofelis Badia)

One of the world’s least-known and most endangered wild cats, the bay cat, has been photographed by Panthera grantees Jedediah Brodie (Universiti Malaysia Sabah/ University of British Columbia) and Anthony Giordano (S.P.E.C.I.E.S/Texas Tech University). Their photograph is the first record of this very elusive cat in the Borneo highlands, at 1460 meters (approximately 4,800 feet).

The records add to our very limited knowledge of the species, which was photographed alive for the first time only in 1998 and where most previous records are from dense lowland forest under 800 meters (approximately 2,600 feet).

Borneo’s bay cat is so elusive that it took over a century before researchers got a chance to study a live one in detail. Covered in striking, rust-red fur with white under the tail and face stripes, this cat was officially named in 1874 on the basis of a skull and torn skin sent to England by the famous naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace. Naturalists didn’t have a chance to study a live one until a bay cat was captured in 1992, and the cat remains so difficult to find that researchers know very little about how this secretive cat actually lives. The fact that the cat is so difficult to find is all the more frustrating because conservationists list the felid as endangered. The deforestation of Borneo may wipe out the bay cat before scientists get a chance to find out more about it.

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