Welcome
into the
world of the
magnificent
cats

Monthly Archives: July 2014

Ongoing Wild Cats World projects

The current WCW project are:

  • Spotted Cats Conservation Project /WCW Leopard Conservation Project S.A.
    Projects and investments in South Africa since 2011 for captive animals (leopard,cheetah, African wildcat, caracal, serval, black-footed cat).
    Currently the project is situated on Daniell farm near Kirkwood, Holmes farm near Cradock (Black-footed cats).
  • Javan leopard release program (JLRP), started in 2013
    Cooperation with Wanicare foundation / Cikananga Sanctuary Java/Indonesia to release wild captured leopards (in conflicts with humans) in the wild again.
  • Nepal Leopard Release Project
    Educational and awareness project in association with Jane Goodall Institute.
  • Madame “X” Project Huge semi-wild project for lions and cheetahs
    This is a private project for celebrity Madame “X”; we respect her wishes not to reveal her name and location and are very honoured she asked Babette de Jonge & Wild Cats World to represent and help her in this wonderful project.

Haven project turns the tide for the Scottish wildcat

250 square mile region of West Highlands now feral cat free according to survey by pro-neutering Wildcat Haven project, halting risk of hybridisation to the critically endangered Scottish wildcat

After a decade of bad news for the Scottish wildcat, in which population estimates have plunged from thousands to less than 35, largely due to cross-mating with feral domestic cats, there is now real hope that the species can be saved from extinction.

bennettwildcat

The Wildcat Haven project in Ardnamurchan and Sunart in the West Highlands, established by the Scottish Wildcat Association to conserve the species by neutering away its primary threat, has announced that after five years of intensive planning, trials and fieldwork funded primarily by grants from US foundations, that the 250 square mile project region appears free of feral cats and feline diseases.

“Cats of any kind are notoriously difficult to survey,” explains project chief scientific advisor Dr Paul O’Donoghue, “however a summer survey turned up nothing and over the last six months we’ve really saturated the area with live traps, cameras, vets and ecologists, and had lots of people from the local community out looking as well. The only feral cats seen have already been neutered, which means the population should collapse naturally within the next couple of years. Once verified, this will be the first time feral cats have been removed from such a large mainland area anywhere in the world.”

Based on a peninsula with a small land bridge, the area is protected by a large, heavily monitored and camera trapped buffer zone at a geographic bottleneck which feral cats cannot migrate past. Further surveys are being carried out and the local community asked to report any sightings, but now the project has its eyes firmly set on the next phase.

“Our goal is to establish populations of genetically pure wildcats,” Explains Dr O’Donoghue, “we are determined not to settle for second best or to settle for a bunch of tabbies that bear a resemblance to wildcats. Protecting anything less than the pure Scottish wildcat will condemn the species to extinction.

“The behaviour of feral cats and pure wildcats is very different, Scotland’s ecology needs the true wildcat and, outside of a wildlife park enclosure, this is the only place in the UK where they are safe from hybridisation.”

The project has drawn strong support locally, in an area with a remarkable diversity of wildlife where people are greatly concerned that any conservation efforts are carefully planned and rolled out.

“This is a huge achievement for everyone involved,” commented Steve Piper, who founded the project with the SWA in 2008, “the project only really moved out of field trials a couple of years ago so this is very rapid progress on something many said was impossible; Wildcat Haven is easily five years ahead of the SNH action plan, they’re well aware of it but have chosen to ignore it; a practical, affordable, fully field tested way to save the genetically pure Scottish wildcat which has built the support of very diverse stakeholders; this is only future the Scottish wildcat has.”

Website: wildcathaven.co.uk

Personal statement to all canned & trophy “hunters”

P1040984_m

Click for larger version


We share this picture not to show off or to encourage everybody to do the same. Leopards are no pets, neither are cheetahs, lions, tigers
etc. and in our WCW projects no one is allowed to interact with our ambassadors, to give them a natural life as possible which works. Come and see for yourself!

With this leopardgirl Felicia we have come a long way to get her in good shape and health, and to make her live a leopard-worthy life with lots of natural space and nice leopardfriends who groom her and play with her. She was almost lost to this world, but now she regained health and strength!

This is about a bond we have. Even though it is a private photo, we decided to show this picture to make a statement to all coward canned & trophy hunters, who feel so brave to pose holding a leopard or other big cat in their arms that they have just shot and killed. They feel brave to pose with a dead wild cat, big shame on them. This is posing with a leopard alive and healthy, important ambassador to her species in the wild and no, we don’t feel brave holding her like this, as you can bond with all living beings as long as you respect them. We need to rescue them.

STOP THE LOWSCUMS KILLING THEM!!!! (don’t try to do this yourself though, as it is of course all about a strong bond, not to go to a
cuddly place and pay money for interaction, as then you will also support Canned Hunting).

May 2014: Cheetahmom gives birth to 6 cubs in Arnhem-Zoo (Netherlands)

It sometimes happens that 6 cubs are born, also in the wild, usually not all of the cubs make it to adulthood. A few years ago a female cheetah did raise succesfully a litter of 6 in the wild (Masai Mara, Kenya.) The biggest litter cheetahcubs was one of 9 cubs (in South Africa, captivity) of which 7 did survive. They were not raised by the mom but by Zanchieta Wildcat farm.

6_cheetahcubs_bornIn Arnhem zoo the mom and her cubs won’t be shown to the public for a while longer as if the mother gets stressed there’s a possibility she can kill or even eat her cubs. So far the cubs are all healthy. Sadly zoos always have a pressmoment which gives a lot of stress to the animals, who already are nervous because of the vaccinations and implant of a chip. This of course doesn’t happen in the wild.

Source: Omroepgelderland.nl


 For Dutch visitors

Help us save wild cats worldwide!

donate2

 

Photogallery
precious_caracal_nina  
Cat of the month

Asian Golden Cat (Pardofelis Temminckii)

The Asian Golden Cat lives throughout Southeast Asia, ranging from Tibet and Nepal to Southern China, India, and Sumatra. It prefers forest habitats interspersed with rocky areas, and is found in deciduous, subtropical evergreen, and tropical rainforests. The Asian Golden Cat is sometimes found in more open terrain. It ranges from the lowlands to altitudes of up to 3000 meters in the Himalayas.

The Asian Golden Cat is a medium-sized wild cat weighing from 12 to 16 kilograms (26 to 35 lbs). In captivity this species can live up to 20 years, but its average lifespan in the wild is likely far shorter. While the fur is mostly foxy red or golden brown, black or grey colour variants may also be found. Normally, the coat is plain, save for some spots on the underside, and sometimes very faint spotting on the rest of the coat. However, in China there is a colour variant with leopard-like-like spots, which resembles a leopard cat.

SONY DSC

Read more...