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Big cats rescued from overcrowded private zoo in Mexico

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Finally… I think all of you know how Wild Cats World participated in a rescue operation from this zoo years back. Well, we took action to be able to rescue the cats from this awful place, but law decided otherwise back then. Today, almost 3 years further, we received this great news from “partner in crime” camera specialist Karla Munguia who did a great docu about her visits to this place, trying to pursue the owner to allow the cats to be rescued. We offered a safe haven at Wild Cats World then and we still do now. Fingers crossed all goes well in this rescue operation

More than 100 animals have been rescued from an overcrowded private zoo in Mexico.
Mexican environmental officials raided the zoo, which is owned by a conservative congressman, after complaints from visitors.

They found overcrowded and cramped cages piled on top of each other and unsafe conditions for visitors.

Among the animals rescued were lions, tigers, jaguars, pumas, bears, buffalos and camels.

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Cat of the month

Jaguarondi (Herpailurus Yagouaroundi)

The jaguarundi (Herpailurus Yaguarondi) is a medium-sized wild cat. Not related to the jaguar, though the name seems to say otherwise, but it’s closely related to the cougar (puma) and also to the cheetah. It has short legs and an appearance somewhat like an otter; the ears are short and rounded. The coat is unspotted, uniform in colour, and varying from blackish to brownish grey (grey phase) or from foxy red to chestnut (red phase). The cat’s ranges from Southern Texas to South America.

As this cat is closely related to the much larger and heavier cougar, evident by its similar genetic structure and chromosome count count, the jaguarundi is also said to be in the genus Puma although it is more often classified under a separate genus, Herpailurus. Until recently both cats were classified under the genus Felis.

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