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Last famous words of 2015, to all supporters of Wild Cats World & Wild Cats Magazine

Last famous words of 2015, to all supporters of Wild Cats World & Wild Cats Magazine

previewLike every ending of a year I like to take the opportunity to address a word of gratitude to all supporters of my foundation Wild Cats World, and all WCW projects, but also to the readers of the webmagazine Wild Cats Magazine.  Especially a big thank you to all (symbolic) adoption parents and supporters donating generously in every other way, supporting our projects and amazing ambassadors of the African wildcats, Black-footed Cats, Caracals, Cheetahs, Leopards and Servals in our S.A. “Spotted Cats Conservation” project. A special thanks to Libor Rajm for continuous support of the Javan Leopard Release Program. Much appreciated!
Thanks are in order to the people we partnered up with in various WCW projects, especially to Richard Daniell for allowing us to do our one captive project on his land in the Eastern Cape/South Africa home to all our beloved ambassadors , and co-operation in the volunteering project “Spotted Cats Conservation”, a mutual project of Daniell Cheetah and Wild Cats World; to Willemijn Eggen of Wanicare Foundation for all the work on ground-level in our Javan Leopard Release Program and Madame X for co-operating with WCW in order to rescue many lions destined for Canned Hunting and to give them a perfect life for as long as they live.
Thanks to our caretakers Betty Dorfling (S.A.) and Jeanette Leinweber (Germany), and all volunteering assisting caretakers in 2015. Many, many thanks to Paul Hoogeveen, our webmaster, doing a great job regularly up-dating the WCW and WCM websites and to Simonne van Driessche helping me to keep the WCW social media pages up-dated, esp. during my stay in the African “bush”.   Last but not least a big thank you to my partner Anton, co-owner of the WCW S.A. project and investments, and all our wonderful ambassadorcats.
Highlights in 2015 for us in Wild Cats World:
1. Leopard female Feline giving birth to 2 gorgeous and healthy cubs, important for our leopard conservation project and Leopard Pride “experiment”, November 4th 2015
2. Arrival of a new male serval Mick and male African wildcat Max from CCT, Karoo, both successfully introduced to their new partners/friends
3. Welcome back home of the black-footed cats, females Beauty and Diva and male Blacky
4. Finishing all the current projects, forming the right couples of all species
Sad events for us at WCW in 2015
1. The sad loss of the important male ambassador of the black-footed cats Blacky, due to kidney failure
2. Sadly after a great start also black-footed cat male kitten Boy wasn’t fit to live, he died at CCT aged 2 months   
We are looking forward to a new year with many great Wild Cats World projects. And at the same time we cannot wait to meet many new (assisting) caretakers and volunteers, but also to welcome back many of you for a second or third time. We wish the best of welfare and health again for our beloved ambassadorcats, and successful births welcoming some cubs/kittens, first of all by leopards Felicia (and Felix). 
Thanks again and see you all in 2016
Merry X-Mas and a Joyful Festive Season!
Babette de Jonge
Director/Founder Wild Cats World/Spotted Cats Conservation
Wild Cats Magazine  

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Cat of the month

Borneo Bay Cat (Pardofelis Badia)

One of the world’s least-known and most endangered wild cats, the bay cat, has been photographed by Panthera grantees Jedediah Brodie (Universiti Malaysia Sabah/ University of British Columbia) and Anthony Giordano (S.P.E.C.I.E.S/Texas Tech University). Their photograph is the first record of this very elusive cat in the Borneo highlands, at 1460 meters (approximately 4,800 feet).

The records add to our very limited knowledge of the species, which was photographed alive for the first time only in 1998 and where most previous records are from dense lowland forest under 800 meters (approximately 2,600 feet).

Borneo’s bay cat is so elusive that it took over a century before researchers got a chance to study a live one in detail. Covered in striking, rust-red fur with white under the tail and face stripes, this cat was officially named in 1874 on the basis of a skull and torn skin sent to England by the famous naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace. Naturalists didn’t have a chance to study a live one until a bay cat was captured in 1992, and the cat remains so difficult to find that researchers know very little about how this secretive cat actually lives. The fact that the cat is so difficult to find is all the more frustrating because conservationists list the felid as endangered. The deforestation of Borneo may wipe out the bay cat before scientists get a chance to find out more about it.

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