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Big cats rescued from overcrowded private zoo in Mexico

mexicozoo

Finally… I think all of you know how Wild Cats World participated in a rescue operation from this zoo years back. Well, we took action to be able to rescue the cats from this awful place, but law decided otherwise back then. Today, almost 3 years further, we received this great news from “partner in crime” camera specialist Karla Munguia who did a great docu about her visits to this place, trying to pursue the owner to allow the cats to be rescued. We offered a safe haven at Wild Cats World then and we still do now. Fingers crossed all goes well in this rescue operation

More than 100 animals have been rescued from an overcrowded private zoo in Mexico.
Mexican environmental officials raided the zoo, which is owned by a conservative congressman, after complaints from visitors.

They found overcrowded and cramped cages piled on top of each other and unsafe conditions for visitors.

Among the animals rescued were lions, tigers, jaguars, pumas, bears, buffalos and camels.

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Conservation targeting tigers pushes leopards to change

A Leopard may not be able to change its spots, but new research from a World Heritage site in Nepal indicates that leopards do change their activity patterns in response to tigers and humans — but in different ways.

The study is the first of its kind to look at how leopards respond to the presence of both tigers and humans simultaneously. Its findings suggest that leopards in and around Nepal’s Chitwan National Park avoid tigers by seeking out different locations to live and hunt.
Since tigers — the socially dominant feline — prefer areas less disturbed by people, leopards are displaced closer to humans. Though they may share some of the same spaces, leopards avoid people on foot and vehicles by shifting their activity to the night.

leopardmichiganA scientific paper based on the study, led by Neil Carter, postdoctoral fellow at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), was published this week in the journal Global Ecology and Conservation. In addition to Carter, the co-authors are Micah Jasny of Duke University, Bhim Gurung of the Nepal Tiger Trust in Chitwan, and Jianguo “Jack” Liu of Michigan State  University.

“This study shows the complexity of coupled human and natural systems,” said Liu, director of the Michigan State University Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability. “It also demonstrates the challenge of conserving multiple endangered species simultaneously.”

Most areas where leopards and tigers co-exist are human-dominated. Accounting for the multi-layered interactions between leopards, tigers, and people is therefore key to understanding the ripple effects of human activities such as conservation actions, the researchers say.

The study has important implications in light of the Global Tiger Recovery Program, which is committed to doubling the worldwide tiger population by 2022. As tiger populations — and the territories they occupy — grow, leopards are increasingly likely to be pushed into areas where people live. The jostling of wildlife occupancy may open the door to more conflicts between people and leopards that could include leopard attacks on both people and livestock, as well as retaliatory killings of leopards.

The researchers’ findings underscore how successful conservation efforts need science that takes into account the complex feedbacks between humans and nature.

“We want to see increased tiger numbers — that’s a great outcome from a conservation perspective. But we also need to anticipate reverberations throughout other parts of the coupled human and natural systems in which tigers are moving into,” said Carter, “such as the ways leopards respond to their new cohabitants, and in turn how humans respond to their new cohabitants.”

While working on his doctoral degree at Michigan State, Carter spent two seasons setting motion-detecting camera traps for leopards, tigers, their prey, and the people who walk the roads and trails of Chitwan, both in and around the park. Chitwan, nestled in a valley along the lowlands of the Himalayas, is home to high numbers of leopards and tigers. People live on the park’s borders, but rely on the forests for ecosystem services such as wood and grasses. They venture in on dirt roads and narrow footpaths to be ‘snared’ on Carter’s digital memory cards. The roads also are used by military patrols to thwart would-be poachers.

Analyses of the thousands of camera trap images begin to tell the story of who is using which spaces and when they’re using them. Sometimes, though, ‘seeing’ isn’t enough.

“People who use camera traps and other kinds of related monitoring tools realize there’s a possibility that the animal is there, but you just didn’t detect it,” said Carter. “For example, your area of interest may be too large to set up cameras everywhere. Or, it’s harder to detect animals in certain forest types if there are a lot of leafy trees blocking the camera’s field of view — even if the animal is right there.”

Because traditional field-based research can be logistically restrictive, time-intensive, and expensive, the researchers used cutting-edge computational models to fill in data gaps and statistically estimate the location and timing of leopard-tiger-human activity.

“The computational component of this research is essential since it allows us to make strong inferences about leopard behavior in Chitwan based on a small sample,” said Jasny, who spent an internship at CSIS working on the leopard-tiger-human data with Carter.

Carter says that while there are many models that look quantitatively at the relationships amongst ecological components of an ecosystem, those models rarely consider humans. Integrating human activity adds a layer of real-world complexity that is more representative of the ecosystem as a whole — providing insights that can help researchers better understand how people and wildlife mutually  influence one another.

Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by Michigan State University.
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.
Source: http://sciencedaily.com/
Image Credit: Image courtesy of Michigan State University

Black-footed cat females give birth

Black footed catWe are pretty sure our black-footed cat female Diva gave birth, 1-2 days ago, but she isn’t allowing any one to see just yet. Like a true protective mommy she is hiding in the dark end of the den. When there is more news we will let you know.

Our other female Beauty and her kitten are still doing great as well!!! Exciting times!

We are especially pleased with the recent births because black footed cats are a relatively rare species. Also, they are difficult to breed.

Wild Cats World ambassadors at Cat Conservation Trust

Personal statement to all canned & trophy “hunters”

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Click for larger version


We share this picture not to show off or to encourage everybody to do the same. Leopards are no pets, neither are cheetahs, lions, tigers
etc. and in our WCW projects no one is allowed to interact with our ambassadors, to give them a natural life as possible which works. Come and see for yourself!

With this leopardgirl Felicia we have come a long way to get her in good shape and health, and to make her live a leopard-worthy life with lots of natural space and nice leopardfriends who groom her and play with her. She was almost lost to this world, but now she regained health and strength!

This is about a bond we have. Even though it is a private photo, we decided to show this picture to make a statement to all coward canned & trophy hunters, who feel so brave to pose holding a leopard or other big cat in their arms that they have just shot and killed. They feel brave to pose with a dead wild cat, big shame on them. This is posing with a leopard alive and healthy, important ambassador to her species in the wild and no, we don’t feel brave holding her like this, as you can bond with all living beings as long as you respect them. We need to rescue them.

STOP THE LOWSCUMS KILLING THEM!!!! (don’t try to do this yourself though, as it is of course all about a strong bond, not to go to a
cuddly place and pay money for interaction, as then you will also support Canned Hunting).


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Cat of the month

African Golden Cat (Profelis Aurata)

The African Golden Cat (Profelis aurata) is a medium-sized wild cat distributed over the rainforests of West and Central Africa. It is about 80 cm (31.5 inches) long, and has a tail of about 30 cm (approximately one foot) in length. It is a close relative of both the Caracal and the Serval. However, current classification places it as the only member of the genus Profelis.

Due to its extremely hidden living style, not much is known about this cat’s behaviour.

The African Golden Cat is able to climb, but hunts primarily on the ground. Prey includes rodents, birds and monkeys. It also hunts duiker and even the Giant Forest Hog.

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