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Leopard

Leopard diving for lunch

In an incredible wildlife moment a leopard leapt from a height of 40 feet to snare a spot of lunch.

The cunning big cat dives from a tree into a herd of startled impala, quickly pinning one of the animals down.

The African antelope moved to graze underneath the tree, unaware that the crafty predator was lurking in the branches several metres above them.

Full article: DailyMail.co.uk

Personal statement to all canned & trophy “hunters”

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We share this picture not to show off or to encourage everybody to do the same. Leopards are no pets, neither are cheetahs, lions, tigers
etc. and in our WCW projects no one is allowed to interact with our ambassadors, to give them a natural life as possible which works. Come and see for yourself!

With this leopardgirl Felicia we have come a long way to get her in good shape and health, and to make her live a leopard-worthy life with lots of natural space and nice leopardfriends who groom her and play with her. She was almost lost to this world, but now she regained health and strength!

This is about a bond we have. Even though it is a private photo, we decided to show this picture to make a statement to all coward canned & trophy hunters, who feel so brave to pose holding a leopard or other big cat in their arms that they have just shot and killed. They feel brave to pose with a dead wild cat, big shame on them. This is posing with a leopard alive and healthy, important ambassador to her species in the wild and no, we don’t feel brave holding her like this, as you can bond with all living beings as long as you respect them. We need to rescue them.

STOP THE LOWSCUMS KILLING THEM!!!! (don’t try to do this yourself though, as it is of course all about a strong bond, not to go to a
cuddly place and pay money for interaction, as then you will also support Canned Hunting).

Save the leopard? How?

savetheleopard[1]A tragic story to read and share worldwide – as this is the reality of the (African) wild leopards in South Africa and how interested people & projects are to try and save this species, like all others, and how is being messed with us, who truly wants to do what’s in our power for the leopards and wild cats. It is very, very tragic and it makes us very sad. By a “befriended” wildcatfarm in SA a few days ago we received this photo of a captured wild female leopard and the
following message “Wild adult female Leopard for sale captured near
the Botswana border. Still in small cage captive. R50 000.00” Your
first thought is to buy and rescue this poor cat right away, but of
course you can’t. You are with your back to the wall, because: this wild leopard is being sold by a farmer, who wants money for the (as he claims) loss to live stock (almost 5.000 euro???). First of all it is illegal to capture and sell wild animals, there are no permits, and buying this leopard would encourage this farmer and all other loosers to capture more wild leopards and make easy money on it. Asking the “leopardman” of SA for help didn’t get us any further. So far we
haven’t got any details from the people capturing and selling the leopard, and the people protecting this kind of deals. Of course, as
people are not to be trusted, we don’t even know for sure if it is about a wild leopard to start with…..No reply from Nature Conservation just yet and no help….but if they take matters in their own hand, it could be a big worry too. Often they give permits to the farmers to shoot the leopards or other animals. So not much help here either. Meanwhile the female is in a very small  cage…waiting for her fate…..being sold (to the wrong people) or being killed? And it is not just about this leopard…..this is the faith of the whole species. Welcome to conservation, welcome to South Africa, welcome to the world where people rule….with no interest in saving “lousy wild” animals to start with. The “farmer” would keep the leopard for 2 days…which will pass today…..and then what?? Any suggestions people????

New leopards in Wild Cats World Leopard Conservation Project

On this picture you see the 2 new Wild Cats World leopard ambassadors: Felicia and brother Floris. Felicia will have our Felix as future partner and for Floris we have found a great home at a new association in our huge leopardproject. More info about the progress in our Conservation Project and the association with new partners in this, will follow shortly. Felicia and Floris are 3 weeks young, born in February 2013. The first ambassador Feline & Felix turned 18 months old and Feline’s future partner Félipe is 6 months now. In April Félipe will be moved permanently to our Spotted Cats Conservation Project in the Eastern Cape, S.A. and he will be introduced in time to Feline and if all goes well to Felix. If they get on well they can use two huge enclosures for the time being until Felicia arrives and they all reach the age of sexual maturity.

 


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Cat of the month

Borneo Bay Cat (Pardofelis Badia)

One of the world’s least-known and most endangered wild cats, the bay cat, has been photographed by Panthera grantees Jedediah Brodie (Universiti Malaysia Sabah/ University of British Columbia) and Anthony Giordano (S.P.E.C.I.E.S/Texas Tech University). Their photograph is the first record of this very elusive cat in the Borneo highlands, at 1460 meters (approximately 4,800 feet).

The records add to our very limited knowledge of the species, which was photographed alive for the first time only in 1998 and where most previous records are from dense lowland forest under 800 meters (approximately 2,600 feet).

Borneo’s bay cat is so elusive that it took over a century before researchers got a chance to study a live one in detail. Covered in striking, rust-red fur with white under the tail and face stripes, this cat was officially named in 1874 on the basis of a skull and torn skin sent to England by the famous naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace. Naturalists didn’t have a chance to study a live one until a bay cat was captured in 1992, and the cat remains so difficult to find that researchers know very little about how this secretive cat actually lives. The fact that the cat is so difficult to find is all the more frustrating because conservationists list the felid as endangered. The deforestation of Borneo may wipe out the bay cat before scientists get a chance to find out more about it.

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