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Big cats rescued from overcrowded private zoo in Mexico

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Finally… I think all of you know how Wild Cats World participated in a rescue operation from this zoo years back. Well, we took action to be able to rescue the cats from this awful place, but law decided otherwise back then. Today, almost 3 years further, we received this great news from “partner in crime” camera specialist Karla Munguia who did a great docu about her visits to this place, trying to pursue the owner to allow the cats to be rescued. We offered a safe haven at Wild Cats World then and we still do now. Fingers crossed all goes well in this rescue operation

More than 100 animals have been rescued from an overcrowded private zoo in Mexico.
Mexican environmental officials raided the zoo, which is owned by a conservative congressman, after complaints from visitors.

They found overcrowded and cramped cages piled on top of each other and unsafe conditions for visitors.

Among the animals rescued were lions, tigers, jaguars, pumas, bears, buffalos and camels.

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Indian boy killed after (voluntarily) jumping into tiger enclosure

dodo2aSeptember 2014 – Shocking video and photo’s of a tiger killing a 20-year boy who violated the Delhi Zoo’s rules by jumping over the fence inside the tiger enclosure.

The tiger did not instantly kill the boy, only after the people threw stones at him and the boy presented himself as prey. The tiger in the end only acted naturally. Dinner was served and it is not polite to refuse, right? Let this also be a lesson for the so many parents encouraging their children to climb the walls and fences of big predators during their visit to the zoo. Tigers are no pussycats…to them this is just another meal thrown in their enclosure… yesterday a cow, tomorrow a pig… today a child.

dodo3It is very sad for the family (and the boy) but still… let this be a very hard and tragic but also a good and final lesson!!!
See the Facebook video.

Tour de France

Wild Cats World did a small “Tour de France” on kind invitation by Parc des Félins and Zoo de Maubeuge, to talk about (wild) cats conservation. The park is of course the dream of every wild catlover, as for space and species, while Maubeuge showed us how it is possible to provide an enriched life to the animals with little means and space.
Of course we kindly accepted to see the Sri Lanka leopardcubs with their (very protective!) mom, a special birth for the species and for a small park like this.

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As for the sandcats (felis marguerita) we discussed the possibility to start with this gorgeous species at our WCW SA project. It would be great to have this species next to the Black footed Cats, the two smallest African wild catspecies. More about this later at a later stage. For now enjoy this photo and many more that will follow!

Update

Sri Lanka leopard cubs, endangered subspecies of the leopard (panther).

We were kindly invited to get a first glimpse of the 6 weeks old cubs at Zoo Maubeuge, the first successful litter of Sri Lanka leopard cubs of 2014 in the world-wide breeding program. The leopardmom was very protective and was hiding the cubs in the straw so it was very difficult to get a glimpse and eventually a good picture. Aren’t they cute?
Sri Lankan leopard (Panthera pardus kotiya)
The Sri Lankan leopard (Panthera pardus kotiya) is a leopard subspecies native to Sri Lanka. Classified as Endangered by IUCN, the population is believed to be declining due to numerous threats including poaching for trade and human-leopard conflicts. No subpopulation is larger than 250 individuals.

May 2014: Cheetahmom gives birth to 6 cubs in Arnhem-Zoo (Netherlands)

It sometimes happens that 6 cubs are born, also in the wild, usually not all of the cubs make it to adulthood. A few years ago a female cheetah did raise succesfully a litter of 6 in the wild (Masai Mara, Kenya.) The biggest litter cheetahcubs was one of 9 cubs (in South Africa, captivity) of which 7 did survive. They were not raised by the mom but by Zanchieta Wildcat farm.

6_cheetahcubs_bornIn Arnhem zoo the mom and her cubs won’t be shown to the public for a while longer as if the mother gets stressed there’s a possibility she can kill or even eat her cubs. So far the cubs are all healthy. Sadly zoos always have a pressmoment which gives a lot of stress to the animals, who already are nervous because of the vaccinations and implant of a chip. This of course doesn’t happen in the wild.

Source: Omroepgelderland.nl


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Cat of the month

Borneo Bay Cat (Pardofelis Badia)

One of the world’s least-known and most endangered wild cats, the bay cat, has been photographed by Panthera grantees Jedediah Brodie (Universiti Malaysia Sabah/ University of British Columbia) and Anthony Giordano (S.P.E.C.I.E.S/Texas Tech University). Their photograph is the first record of this very elusive cat in the Borneo highlands, at 1460 meters (approximately 4,800 feet).

The records add to our very limited knowledge of the species, which was photographed alive for the first time only in 1998 and where most previous records are from dense lowland forest under 800 meters (approximately 2,600 feet).

Borneo’s bay cat is so elusive that it took over a century before researchers got a chance to study a live one in detail. Covered in striking, rust-red fur with white under the tail and face stripes, this cat was officially named in 1874 on the basis of a skull and torn skin sent to England by the famous naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace. Naturalists didn’t have a chance to study a live one until a bay cat was captured in 1992, and the cat remains so difficult to find that researchers know very little about how this secretive cat actually lives. The fact that the cat is so difficult to find is all the more frustrating because conservationists list the felid as endangered. The deforestation of Borneo may wipe out the bay cat before scientists get a chance to find out more about it.

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