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SOS Lynx

SOSLynx is an independent campaign organisation set up in 2000 to promote the conservation of the Iberian Lynx, and works at local and international levels.

The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), sometimes referred to as the Spanish lynx, is a critically endangered feline mammal native to the Iberian Peninsula in Southern Europ, being the most endangered feline species in the world. According to SOS Lynx, if this species died out, it would be the first feline extinction since prehisotic times. The species often used to be misclassified as a subspecies of the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), but is now considered a separate species. Both species occurred together in central Europe in the Pleistocene epoch, being separated by habitat choice. The Iberian lynx is believed to have evolved from lynx issioderensis.

SOS Lynx is a non-for-profit association that works in a number of areas including: awareness raising; lobbying; researching, writing, and publishing reports, and; producing materials for use in schools and with hunters and rural landowners. In the future we also aim to: expand our education work; initiate habitat and rabbit recovery in Portugal, and; work directly with hunters, landowners and policymakers to reduce threats to the Iberian Lynx and other top predators in Portugal.

Most of their work is conducted by volunteers. Thus, all of your donation will go towards funding their important work.

www.soslynx.org

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Cat of the month

Borneo Bay Cat (Pardofelis Badia)

One of the world’s least-known and most endangered wild cats, the bay cat, has been photographed by Panthera grantees Jedediah Brodie (Universiti Malaysia Sabah/ University of British Columbia) and Anthony Giordano (S.P.E.C.I.E.S/Texas Tech University). Their photograph is the first record of this very elusive cat in the Borneo highlands, at 1460 meters (approximately 4,800 feet).

The records add to our very limited knowledge of the species, which was photographed alive for the first time only in 1998 and where most previous records are from dense lowland forest under 800 meters (approximately 2,600 feet).

Borneo’s bay cat is so elusive that it took over a century before researchers got a chance to study a live one in detail. Covered in striking, rust-red fur with white under the tail and face stripes, this cat was officially named in 1874 on the basis of a skull and torn skin sent to England by the famous naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace. Naturalists didn’t have a chance to study a live one until a bay cat was captured in 1992, and the cat remains so difficult to find that researchers know very little about how this secretive cat actually lives. The fact that the cat is so difficult to find is all the more frustrating because conservationists list the felid as endangered. The deforestation of Borneo may wipe out the bay cat before scientists get a chance to find out more about it.

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