Welcome
into the
world of the
magnificent
cats

Pampas Cat (Oncifelis Colocolo)

This is a juvenile Pampas Cat, photographed at about 13,500 feet (4100 meters). The adults aren’t much bigger than this little one, so you can imagine how small these cats really are. At between 6.5 and 9 lbs (3-4 kg) they are smaller than your house cat.
Their numbers are decreasing due to mining, loss of prey, and direct persecution among other threats.

This image is part of Cat in Thin Air, a photojournalistic project showcasing the endangered Andean Mountain Cat with concrete goals to help its conservation.

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Machali, Queen of the tigers

Honorable ‘funeral’ for the Grand Lady of Ranthambhore National Park (India), tigress Machali,  who passed away Thursday 16th of August 2016, due to old age. The funeral and memorial she deserves, what a special ‘cat’. We will never forget meeting her up close, hearing her roar and seeing her make a kill, even with one canine left (see link to video).

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http://www.holidogtimes.com/fr/machali-la-plus-vielle-tigresse-du-monde-vient-de-seteindre-tout-un-pays-en-deuil/#gs.aflYu=A

Our video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzPum8yFqEU

Wildcat Guarded Body of Drowned U.S. Child in Costa Rica

Red Cross volunteers searching for a drowned young tourist from the United States were led to discovery by a jaguarundi (eyra cat, similar to a mountain lion), which seemed to be guarding the deceased child.

As reported by The Costa Rica Star earlier this week, a flash flood swept away three U.S. tourists swimming in the Blanco river in the Rincon de la Vieja (Old Woman’s Corner) National Park, province of Guanacaste. Two victims, a 67-year old woman, a 38-year old man were recovered by Red Cross rescuers on the day of the incident. The 6-year old child would be found a day later.

On Friday morning, rescuers were combing the riverbank about a kilometer from the spot where the boy was last seen, when their attention turned to a jaguarundi that was pacing in a semicircular pattern while grunting towards the water.

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More….

Arabian Sand Cat Spotted for First Time in a Decade

The Arabian sand cat has been seen for the first time in 10 years in the United Arab Emirates.

The Arabian sand cat has been seen for the first time in 10 years in the United Arab Emirates.

Opslået af Discovery på 10. august 2016

Endangered Andea Cats hiding in South America

Endangered Andea Cats hiding in South America

Close your eyes and picture what you believe to be an endangered wild cat. What do you see? Perhaps a snow leopard from Nepal? Maybe a Cheetah from Namibia or a Bengal Tiger? Worthy animals all. But I’ll bet that you aren’t visualizing the Andean Cat and yet’s it is believed to be the most threatened wild cat in the Americas. This small cat is about the size of a typical house cat and just as fluffy. But its low population and elusive nature have prevented it from becoming the viral video star of your Facebook feed.

Endangered Andean Cats, Hiding Out in South America


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Photogallery

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Cat of the month

Jaguarondi (Herpailurus Yagouaroundi)

The jaguarundi (Herpailurus Yaguarondi) is a medium-sized wild cat. Not related to the jaguar, though the name seems to say otherwise, but it’s closely related to the cougar (puma) and also to the cheetah. It has short legs and an appearance somewhat like an otter; the ears are short and rounded. The coat is unspotted, uniform in colour, and varying from blackish to brownish grey (grey phase) or from foxy red to chestnut (red phase). The cat’s ranges from Southern Texas to South America.

As this cat is closely related to the much larger and heavier cougar, evident by its similar genetic structure and chromosome count count, the jaguarundi is also said to be in the genus Puma although it is more often classified under a separate genus, Herpailurus. Until recently both cats were classified under the genus Felis.

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