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Reality of Nature

This picture from the Mara Cheetah project shows the reality of nature. This leopard killed the cheetah and is actually treating it like any other prey: hanging it in the tree and eating it. The strength of a leopard, leaving no chance to eat and food go to waste, even if this means (or even so!) eating another predator.

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It is difficult to see, also for us working with/for both species, but we have to be realistic here too. It shouldn’t affect us more than any other prey animal that gets killed and hang in the tree to serve for dinner, but it still does? It is luckily an unusual sight, not happening too often, but with the cheetah having difficulties to survive in the wild we hope this will stay a rare occasion. Even though we also agree: the leopard has to eat (every coin has two sides)!

 

Black-footed cat females give birth

Black footed catWe are pretty sure our black-footed cat female Diva gave birth, 1-2 days ago, but she isn’t allowing any one to see just yet. Like a true protective mommy she is hiding in the dark end of the den. When there is more news we will let you know.

Our other female Beauty and her kitten are still doing great as well!!! Exciting times!

We are especially pleased with the recent births because black footed cats are a relatively rare species. Also, they are difficult to breed.

Wild Cats World ambassadors at Cat Conservation Trust -

Leopard diving for lunch

In an incredible wildlife moment a leopard leapt from a height of 40 feet to snare a spot of lunch.

The cunning big cat dives from a tree into a herd of startled impala, quickly pinning one of the animals down.

The African antelope moved to graze underneath the tree, unaware that the crafty predator was lurking in the branches several metres above them.

Full article: DailyMail.co.uk

Indian boy killed after (voluntarily) jumping into tiger enclosure

dodo2aSeptember 2014 – Shocking video and photo’s of a tiger killing a 20-year boy who violated the Delhi Zoo’s rules by jumping over the fence inside the tiger enclosure.

The tiger did not instantly kill the boy, only after the people threw stones at him and the boy presented himself as prey. The tiger in the end only acted naturally. Dinner was served and it is not polite to refuse, right? Let this also be a lesson for the so many parents encouraging their children to climb the walls and fences of big predators during their visit to the zoo. Tigers are no pussycats…to them this is just another meal thrown in their enclosure… yesterday a cow, tomorrow a pig… today a child.

dodo3It is very sad for the family (and the boy) but still… let this be a very hard and tragic but also a good and final lesson!!!
See the Facebook video.

In loving memory… NINA ( † 14-09-2012)

IMG_5421Of course you died far too young
But the memory to you is still so strong
You clearly came to us for a reason
We will remember you, throughout every season…
Showing us who were so wrong, and who were right
United we (WCW) will stand in the continuous fight
No one has the right to molest an innocent creature
A sweet lovely caracalgirl who had a bright future
Many of us did shed a tear
But some are still in denial and don’t want to hear
We know we are right and forever have to miss you
Somehow we believe in the end justice will prevail too.
No more free PR for the horrible place that took your life
Hurting us deeply like a deep cut from a knife
To destroy this so-called sanctuary they don’t need a helping hand
As clearly animal care and conservation is what they still don’t understand
We scattered your ashes at our project in South Africa
Your spirit will guard over the caracals Leo & Lea

Tour de France

Wild Cats World did a small “Tour de France” on kind invitation by Parc des Félins and Zoo de Maubeuge, to talk about (wild) cats conservation. The park is of course the dream of every wild catlover, as for space and species, while Maubeuge showed us how it is possible to provide an enriched life to the animals with little means and space.
Of course we kindly accepted to see the Sri Lanka leopardcubs with their (very protective!) mom, a special birth for the species and for a small park like this.

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As for the sandcats (felis marguerita) we discussed the possibility to start with this gorgeous species at our WCW SA project. It would be great to have this species next to the Black footed Cats, the two smallest African wild catspecies. More about this later at a later stage. For now enjoy this photo and many more that will follow!

Update

Sri Lanka leopard cubs, endangered subspecies of the leopard (panther).

We were kindly invited to get a first glimpse of the 6 weeks old cubs at Zoo Maubeuge, the first successful litter of Sri Lanka leopard cubs of 2014 in the world-wide breeding program. The leopardmom was very protective and was hiding the cubs in the straw so it was very difficult to get a glimpse and eventually a good picture. Aren’t they cute?
Sri Lankan leopard (Panthera pardus kotiya)
The Sri Lankan leopard (Panthera pardus kotiya) is a leopard subspecies native to Sri Lanka. Classified as Endangered by IUCN, the population is believed to be declining due to numerous threats including poaching for trade and human-leopard conflicts. No subpopulation is larger than 250 individuals.

Ongoing Wild Cats World projects

The current WCW project are:

  • Spotted Cats Conservation Project /WCW Leopard Conservation Project S.A.
    Projects and investments in South Africa since 2011 for captive animals (leopard,cheetah, African wildcat, caracal, serval, black-footed cat).
    Currently the project is situated on Daniell farm near Kirkwood, Holmes farm near Cradock (Black-footed cats).
  • Javan leopard release program (JLRP), started in 2013
    Cooperation with Wanicare foundation / Cikananga Sanctuary Java/Indonesia to release wild captured leopards (in conflicts with humans) in the wild again.
  • Nepal Leopard Release Project
    Educational and awareness project in association with Jane Goodall Institute.
  • Madame “X” Project Huge semi-wild project for lions and cheetahs
    This is a private project for celebrity Madame “X”; we respect her wishes not to reveal her name and location and are very honoured she asked Babette de Jonge & Wild Cats World to represent and help her in this wonderful project.

Haven project turns the tide for the Scottish wildcat

250 square mile region of West Highlands now feral cat free according to survey by pro-neutering Wildcat Haven project, halting risk of hybridisation to the critically endangered Scottish wildcat

After a decade of bad news for the Scottish wildcat, in which population estimates have plunged from thousands to less than 35, largely due to cross-mating with feral domestic cats, there is now real hope that the species can be saved from extinction.

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The Wildcat Haven project in Ardnamurchan and Sunart in the West Highlands, established by the Scottish Wildcat Association to conserve the species by neutering away its primary threat, has announced that after five years of intensive planning, trials and fieldwork funded primarily by grants from US foundations, that the 250 square mile project region appears free of feral cats and feline diseases.

“Cats of any kind are notoriously difficult to survey,” explains project chief scientific advisor Dr Paul O’Donoghue, “however a summer survey turned up nothing and over the last six months we’ve really saturated the area with live traps, cameras, vets and ecologists, and had lots of people from the local community out looking as well. The only feral cats seen have already been neutered, which means the population should collapse naturally within the next couple of years. Once verified, this will be the first time feral cats have been removed from such a large mainland area anywhere in the world.”

Based on a peninsula with a small land bridge, the area is protected by a large, heavily monitored and camera trapped buffer zone at a geographic bottleneck which feral cats cannot migrate past. Further surveys are being carried out and the local community asked to report any sightings, but now the project has its eyes firmly set on the next phase.

“Our goal is to establish populations of genetically pure wildcats,” Explains Dr O’Donoghue, “we are determined not to settle for second best or to settle for a bunch of tabbies that bear a resemblance to wildcats. Protecting anything less than the pure Scottish wildcat will condemn the species to extinction.

“The behaviour of feral cats and pure wildcats is very different, Scotland’s ecology needs the true wildcat and, outside of a wildlife park enclosure, this is the only place in the UK where they are safe from hybridisation.”

The project has drawn strong support locally, in an area with a remarkable diversity of wildlife where people are greatly concerned that any conservation efforts are carefully planned and rolled out.

“This is a huge achievement for everyone involved,” commented Steve Piper, who founded the project with the SWA in 2008, “the project only really moved out of field trials a couple of years ago so this is very rapid progress on something many said was impossible; Wildcat Haven is easily five years ahead of the SNH action plan, they’re well aware of it but have chosen to ignore it; a practical, affordable, fully field tested way to save the genetically pure Scottish wildcat which has built the support of very diverse stakeholders; this is only future the Scottish wildcat has.”

Website: wildcathaven.co.uk

Personal statement to all canned & trophy “hunters”

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Click for larger version


We share this picture not to show off or to encourage everybody to do the same. Leopards are no pets, neither are cheetahs, lions, tigers
etc. and in our WCW projects no one is allowed to interact with our ambassadors, to give them a natural life as possible which works. Come and see for yourself!

With this leopardgirl Felicia we have come a long way to get her in good shape and health, and to make her live a leopard-worthy life with lots of natural space and nice leopardfriends who groom her and play with her. She was almost lost to this world, but now she regained health and strength!

This is about a bond we have. Even though it is a private photo, we decided to show this picture to make a statement to all coward canned & trophy hunters, who feel so brave to pose holding a leopard or other big cat in their arms that they have just shot and killed. They feel brave to pose with a dead wild cat, big shame on them. This is posing with a leopard alive and healthy, important ambassador to her species in the wild and no, we don’t feel brave holding her like this, as you can bond with all living beings as long as you respect them. We need to rescue them.

STOP THE LOWSCUMS KILLING THEM!!!! (don’t try to do this yourself though, as it is of course all about a strong bond, not to go to a
cuddly place and pay money for interaction, as then you will also support Canned Hunting).


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Photogallery

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Cat of the month

Asian Leopard Cat (Prionailurus bengalensis)

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The Asian Leopard Cat is a small wild cat and has the widest geographic distribution of all felines. It can be found in forest areas throughout central and pacific asia.

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