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Conservation

One to Read: Wilde Verwandte by Wolfgang Schwerdt

For German speaking/reading wildcat enthusiasts. In this book author Wolfgang kindly pays attention to Wild Cats World and our conservation projects for the leopard, black-footed cats, etc.

In short….

Marbled cat, Sumatran tiger, leopard, clouded leopard, or black-footed cat. 
They all have one thing in common: they are on the brink of extinction.
Since the emergence of the first civilizations, they are hunted, as well as admired. The wild species and their natural habitat are decreasing rapidly 
everywhere in the world.

In this book a cultural and historical journey of the early years of the 17th century, in which the fictional ship cat Rotbart (a tomcat) experienced his adventures, until modern times with its present challenges, causing the so-called sixth mass extinction of Earth’s history. The wild cats are related to the Rotbart, the hero of the story.

The reader will take a journey into the world of divine rulers, cultural heroes, man-eating cats of prey, unscrupulous traders, historic eradication campaigns and passionate conservationists. Because the cultural history of anthropogenic biodiversity is characterized by greed, power, scientific passion, religious beliefs and a heavy dose of stupidity of the species, ancestors of Homo sapiens.

A different journey meeting the “wilde Verwandte”

TM and TCM incorporated by WHO – appeal to WHO members to guarantee the protection of endangered plant and animal species

A great cause we are committed to – please do sign & share as much as you can.

Scottish Lynx reintrodution consultations & potential sites

Lynx reintroduction consultations and roadshow dates announced at
potential release sites in Scotland

Male Eurasian lynx Juno

The Lynx UK Trust have identified three sites in Scotland for intensive consultations on a lynx reintroduction trial, one of which is just 30 miles from Glasgow. Launching the consultations a lynx roadshow will tour the Scottish sites in the first week of March.

FOR RELEASE 00.01AM FRIDAY 15TH FEBRUARY 2019 (LYNX UKTRUST)

Following on from an announcement that they were surveying Scotland in
late 2017, the Lynx UK Trust have identified three locations which could act as release sites for the medium-sized cats, and have announced intensive consultations with local communities and businesses for a trial reintroduction application.

Independent scientific research has shown that Scotland’s forest could sustain around 400 of the cats, which ecologists believe could help control the UK’s over-populated deer herds, leading to a regeneration of forest ecosystems that would benefit all of the UK’s native wildlife.

The Trust has also outlined a vast potential for lynx to bring eco-tourism revenue to remote rural communities, based on case studies of lynx reintroductions in Germany’s Harz national park.

The three areas identified for the intensive consultations are;

  • Queen Elizabeth Forest Park region, just north of Glasgow
  • Glen Feshie region, next to the Cairngorms National Park
  • Kintyre Peninsula region in Argyll and Bute

Lynx UK Trust’s Chief Scientific Advisor Paul O’Donoghue explained;
“We’ve spent about 18 months looking at habitats across Scotland and talking to various stakeholders about a trial reintroduction of lynx. Based on ecological factors like deer density and habitat suitability, these three areas have been identified for much more intensive consultation with local communities. This will ultimately lead to a multiple site application to Scottish Natural Heritage to carry out a trial reintroduction of Eurasian lynx.”

No lynx attack on a human has ever been recorded anywhere, though lynx reintroduction is a controversial issue with sheep farming unions concerned that the cats would decimate herds, though numerous independent studies make clear that sheep are an exceptionally rare target for lynx, even when the two live side by side. O’Donoghue commented, “We certainly recognise the concerns that sheep farmers have, though farming unions have repeatedly over-stated the threat, even claiming that lynx could threaten the food security of the entire UK which is pure fantasy. I hope we can have a much improved consultation with farmers living and working in these areas to fully explain the threats in a factual manner, alongside a clear explanation of the benefits. “We will be offering local farmers a range of support with predator mitigation techniques, and providing full insurance against lynx predation.

Eurasian lynx

Lloyds of London, the largest insurance market in the world, will insure every sheep in Britain, and pay out above market rate compensation. Besides the ecological benefits, there are very clear real-world examples of lynx bringing phenomenal eco-tourism revenue and jobs to remote rural areas which would benefit the entire local community, particularly tourism and hospitality businesses.

“We’re really excited to launch the intensive consultations with a roadshow touring the sites in the first week of March, bringing teams of lynx experts directly to local communities to hear how the people of Scotland would feel about lynx returning to the forests. There’s some fantastic habitat connectivity in Scotland making it possible for lynx to live all the way from Glasgow to Inverness and across to the Cairngorms if a trial reintroduction was successful, bringing huge positive change to rural communities across the Highlands.”

The first confirmed dates for public drop in meetings are as follows:Tarbert village hall, Argyll: 5thmarch 2-4 pm Aberfoyle Community Centre, Perthshire: 6thmarch 2-4 pm

Kincraig Community Hall, Highland: 7thmarch 2-4 pmIMAGES courtesy of
Chris Godfrey Wildlife Photography

The smallest wild cats

rusty spotted catLike we always say: the small(est) cats are as important as the big(gest) ones. Rusty spotted cats, one of the gorgeous smaller species, smallest cat of Asia, like the black-footed cats are of South Africa… smallest of the world!

Conservation targeting tigers pushes leopards to change

A Leopard may not be able to change its spots, but new research from a World Heritage site in Nepal indicates that leopards do change their activity patterns in response to tigers and humans — but in different ways.

The study is the first of its kind to look at how leopards respond to the presence of both tigers and humans simultaneously. Its findings suggest that leopards in and around Nepal’s Chitwan National Park avoid tigers by seeking out different locations to live and hunt.
Since tigers — the socially dominant feline — prefer areas less disturbed by people, leopards are displaced closer to humans. Though they may share some of the same spaces, leopards avoid people on foot and vehicles by shifting their activity to the night.

leopardmichiganA scientific paper based on the study, led by Neil Carter, postdoctoral fellow at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), was published this week in the journal Global Ecology and Conservation. In addition to Carter, the co-authors are Micah Jasny of Duke University, Bhim Gurung of the Nepal Tiger Trust in Chitwan, and Jianguo “Jack” Liu of Michigan State  University.

“This study shows the complexity of coupled human and natural systems,” said Liu, director of the Michigan State University Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability. “It also demonstrates the challenge of conserving multiple endangered species simultaneously.”

Most areas where leopards and tigers co-exist are human-dominated. Accounting for the multi-layered interactions between leopards, tigers, and people is therefore key to understanding the ripple effects of human activities such as conservation actions, the researchers say.

The study has important implications in light of the Global Tiger Recovery Program, which is committed to doubling the worldwide tiger population by 2022. As tiger populations — and the territories they occupy — grow, leopards are increasingly likely to be pushed into areas where people live. The jostling of wildlife occupancy may open the door to more conflicts between people and leopards that could include leopard attacks on both people and livestock, as well as retaliatory killings of leopards.

The researchers’ findings underscore how successful conservation efforts need science that takes into account the complex feedbacks between humans and nature.

“We want to see increased tiger numbers — that’s a great outcome from a conservation perspective. But we also need to anticipate reverberations throughout other parts of the coupled human and natural systems in which tigers are moving into,” said Carter, “such as the ways leopards respond to their new cohabitants, and in turn how humans respond to their new cohabitants.”

While working on his doctoral degree at Michigan State, Carter spent two seasons setting motion-detecting camera traps for leopards, tigers, their prey, and the people who walk the roads and trails of Chitwan, both in and around the park. Chitwan, nestled in a valley along the lowlands of the Himalayas, is home to high numbers of leopards and tigers. People live on the park’s borders, but rely on the forests for ecosystem services such as wood and grasses. They venture in on dirt roads and narrow footpaths to be ‘snared’ on Carter’s digital memory cards. The roads also are used by military patrols to thwart would-be poachers.

Analyses of the thousands of camera trap images begin to tell the story of who is using which spaces and when they’re using them. Sometimes, though, ‘seeing’ isn’t enough.

“People who use camera traps and other kinds of related monitoring tools realize there’s a possibility that the animal is there, but you just didn’t detect it,” said Carter. “For example, your area of interest may be too large to set up cameras everywhere. Or, it’s harder to detect animals in certain forest types if there are a lot of leafy trees blocking the camera’s field of view — even if the animal is right there.”

Because traditional field-based research can be logistically restrictive, time-intensive, and expensive, the researchers used cutting-edge computational models to fill in data gaps and statistically estimate the location and timing of leopard-tiger-human activity.

“The computational component of this research is essential since it allows us to make strong inferences about leopard behavior in Chitwan based on a small sample,” said Jasny, who spent an internship at CSIS working on the leopard-tiger-human data with Carter.

Carter says that while there are many models that look quantitatively at the relationships amongst ecological components of an ecosystem, those models rarely consider humans. Integrating human activity adds a layer of real-world complexity that is more representative of the ecosystem as a whole — providing insights that can help researchers better understand how people and wildlife mutually  influence one another.

Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by Michigan State University.
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.
Source: http://sciencedaily.com/
Image Credit: Image courtesy of Michigan State University

Tour de France

Wild Cats World did a small “Tour de France” on kind invitation by Parc des Félins and Zoo de Maubeuge, to talk about (wild) cats conservation. The park is of course the dream of every wild catlover, as for space and species, while Maubeuge showed us how it is possible to provide an enriched life to the animals with little means and space.
Of course we kindly accepted to see the Sri Lanka leopardcubs with their (very protective!) mom, a special birth for the species and for a small park like this.

IMG_8685

As for the sandcats (felis marguerita) we discussed the possibility to start with this gorgeous species at our WCW SA project. It would be great to have this species next to the Black footed Cats, the two smallest African wild catspecies. More about this later at a later stage. For now enjoy this photo and many more that will follow!

Update

Sri Lanka leopard cubs, endangered subspecies of the leopard (panther).

We were kindly invited to get a first glimpse of the 6 weeks old cubs at Zoo Maubeuge, the first successful litter of Sri Lanka leopard cubs of 2014 in the world-wide breeding program. The leopardmom was very protective and was hiding the cubs in the straw so it was very difficult to get a glimpse and eventually a good picture. Aren’t they cute?
Sri Lankan leopard (Panthera pardus kotiya)
The Sri Lankan leopard (Panthera pardus kotiya) is a leopard subspecies native to Sri Lanka. Classified as Endangered by IUCN, the population is believed to be declining due to numerous threats including poaching for trade and human-leopard conflicts. No subpopulation is larger than 250 individuals.